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Tuesday, May 12, 2020 | History

1 edition of Psychosocial factors and problems at the workplace found in the catalog.

Psychosocial factors and problems at the workplace

Psychosocial factors and problems at the workplace

proceedings of a symposium

  • 387 Want to read
  • 32 Currently reading

Published by s.n. in [Manila .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Philippines
    • Subjects:
    • Industrial sociology -- Philippines -- Congresses.,
    • Psychology, Industrial -- Philippines -- Congresses.,
    • Industrial hygiene -- Philippines -- Congresses.

    • Edition Notes

      StatementDulce P. Estrella-Gust, editor.
      ContributionsEstrella-Gust, Dulce P., Symposium on Psychosocial Factors and Problems at the Workplace (1988 : Quezon City, Philippines)
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsHD6957.P6 P78 1988
      The Physical Object
      Paginationx, 207 p. ;
      Number of Pages207
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL2016015M
      LC Control Number90943572

      Psychological risk factors for mental health disorders are comprised of personality traits, thoughts, emotions, and attitudes that could make a person more likely to develop a mental health disorder.   Objectives: Major depression is a leading cause of psychiatric morbidity and may be influenced by psychosocial factors in the workplace, although evidence so far remains circumstantial. This paper reviews follow-up studies addressing the risk of major depression and depressive symptoms relative to psychosocial stressors in the working environment and evaluates the evidence for by:

      Andrew Steptoe, in International Encyclopedia of the Social & Behavioral Sciences (Second Edition), Protective Psychosocial Factors. The psychosocial factors described earlier increase risk of CHD. There is also a series of factors that may reduce risk (Table 1).Chief among these are positive social relationships, including social integration and social support. Sixteen population- or organisation-based follow-up studies, primarily conducted in European countries, provide consistent findings that the perception of adverse psychosocial factors in the workplace (e.g. high job demands, low decision latitude, lack of organisational support) is associated with a moderately increased risk of subsequent depressive illness or symptoms.

      MEASURING AND CONTROLLING WORK - RELATED STRESS AND IMPROVING MENTAL WELL-BEING AT THE WORKPLACE. A tool to evaluate the level of work-related stress and the measures to be taken thereof to control the same have been extensively used.[7–10] This tool which is known as the Work Stress Scale (WSS) allows individuals to assess for themselves the degree of stress faced in .   Abstract. Background Knowledge on the impact of the psychosocial work environment on the occurrence of stress-related disorders (SRDs) can assist occupational physicians in the assessment of the work-relatedness of these disorders.. Aims To systematically review the contribution of work-related psychosocial risk factors to SRDs.. Methods A systematic review of the literature Cited by:


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Psychosocial factors and problems at the workplace Download PDF EPUB FB2

Psychosocial factors at work and their consequences, emphasising health issues. It describes the nature of such factors as related to health and the methods of identifying psychosocial factors. It also examines the means of preventing, reducing or eliminating the psychosocial problems that arise in places of work.

Psychosocial factors include the way work is carried out (deadlines, workload, work methods) and the context in which work occurs (including relationships and interactions with managers and supervisors, colleagues and coworkers, and clients or customers).File Size: KB.

demonstrated that health is related to psychosocial factors at work, and that their role in relation to both health status and the causation of disease is relatively wide in scope. Psychosocial factors can contribute to the causation and aggravation of a disease and affect the outcome of curative and rehabilitative measures.

Introduction. There are many factors contributing to musculoskeletal discomfort and disorders in the workplace. The risk factors that have been associated with musculoskeletal problems are physical (such as awkward or prolonged postures) and individual (such as level of physical fitness or gender1and psychosocial).File Size: KB.

Examples of positive psychosocial work environment factors are: social capital 6, meaningfulness 7, engagement 8 and commitment 9 and the concept of positive factors is therefore a broad term. The relationship between psychological factors and the physical body can be influenced by social factors, the effects of which are mediated through psychological understanding.

Examples of psychosocial factors include social support, loneliness, marriage status, social disruption, bereavement, work environment, social status, and social integration. The aim of Study I was to identify psychosocial factors at work that promote positive changes in employee health and factors that prevent negative changes in employee health.

The Psychosocial risk factors at work Imply those conditions present in the workplace that can harm the health of workers, causing stress and, more in the long term, diseases. Cox & Griffiths () define psychosocial risks as"those aspects of the conception, organization and management of work, as well as their social and environmental context that have the potential to cause physical, social or Author: Ruth Bednar.

IFAU – The relationship between psychosocial work factors, employee health and organizational production. 1 Introduction. Developments in the global market with increased competition from national as well as international companies have contributed to. Not all employees will have the same work-life balance issues.

Age, cultural, gender, family and marital status, care-giver demands, socioeconomic status and many other factors affect an employee's work-life balance. Organizations will benefit from having flexible arrangements to address this issue. Psychological Protection. Psychosocial factors are influences that affect a person psychologically or socially.

There are multidimensional constructs encompassing several domains such as mood status (anxiety, depression, distress, and positive affect), cognitive behavioral responses (satisfaction, self-efficacy, self-esteem, and locus of control), and social factors (socioeconomic status, education, employment.

Hazards. There are many types of hazards - chemical, ergonomic, physical, and psychosocial, to name a few - which can cause harm or adverse effects in the workplace. Get resources on specific hazards and their control, including identification, risk assessment and inspections, to keep your workplace healthy and safe.

Psychosocial factors are elements that impact employees' psychological responses to work and work conditions, potentially causing psychological health problems.

Psychosocial risk factors and hazards Work-related stress has the potential to negatively affect an individual's psychological and physical health, as well as an organisation's effectiveness. Therefore, it is recognized world-wide as a major challenge to workers' health and the health of their organizations.

Several key issues, called Psychosocial Risk Factors have been shown to have a significant effect on employee mental health, overall organizational health, and the financial bottom line.

Psychological Support - A workplace where co-workers and supervisors are supportive of employees' psychological and mental health concerns, and respond. A multitude of factors can complicate the return-to-work process for many injured workers. Research on workers’ compensation claimants points to the “important role of psychosocial factors as determinants of disability” asso-ciated with work-related injuries (Sullivan et al.,p.

This article illuminates psychosocial factors that. The influence of psychosocial factors on mental health in childhood, not a new concept in psychological studies, has focused on several key themes. Over the past 50 years, a vast body of work has studied psychosocial adversity and childhood psychopathology.

In the late s, mental hygiene movements in the United States and Britain focused on the interplay between children's interpersonal Cited by: 1. Macleod and Davey Smith state that the aim of their paper is to critically examine the role of psychosocial factors in health.

1 Unfortunately, what could have been an interesting discussion is compromised by the authors implicit assumption that there is a single pathway linking social position to health. The authors seem to equate parsimonious causal analysis with a narrow, reductionistic Cited by: • improving communication among return-to-work stakeholders, or • providing information to the worker about the return-to-work process • aligning unions and management on return to work practices • Ensuring efficiency with investigations • Promoting creative accommodations • Adapted from Pomaki et al Work To Wellness.

6 11 Psychosocial work factors üSocial interactions: §Social support from supervisor and colleagues §Supervisor complaints, praise, monitoring §Dealing with (difficult) clients/customers üRole factors §Role ambiguity §Role conflict üJob future and career issues: §Job future ambiguity §Fear of job loss 12 Psychosocial work factors üTechnology issues: §Computer-related problemsFile Size: 1MB.

Because there are so many factors, except in the case of a severe psychological trauma (such as being assaulted on the job), it’s rare to draw a definitive link between a person’s work situation and the development of a mental health problem. We do know that workplace factors associated with how we organize our work and manage our people.

Adverse psychosocial exposure or “misery” is associated with physical disease. This association may not be causal. Rather it may reflect issues of reverse causation, reporting bias, and confounding by aspects of the material environment typically associated with misery.

A non-causal relation will not form the basis of effective public health interventions. This may be why psychosocial Cited by: A novel investigation by E.

L. Bergsten et al. in the paper “Psychosocial Work Factors and Musculoskeletal Pain: a Cross-Sectional Study among Swedish Flight Baggage Handlers” offers an investigation of the relationship between psychosocial exposures and musculoskeletal health among flight baggage by: 5.